3 p.m. Bulletin

UK officials reiterate that Gaddafi is not a target

by Kirsty Tobin

15.24 UK officials have reiterated that Gaddafi is under no circumstances a target.

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded, [Read more...]

Last days before dissolution

by Gráinne Byrne

Third session of Holyrood about to go into recess

As we approach the last official day for Holyrood MSPs before Parliamentary recess, opposing parties are marking their line in the sand ahead of tomorrow’s final questions session.  This final session, before dissolution, sets the tone for a battle between the parties leading to the election on 5 May 2011.

In an attempt to engage with the public, First Minister Alex Salmond and his main opponent, Labour leader Iain Gray, will take part in various debates over the next few weeks.  Key issues in the frame include higher education, the economy, the health system and, perhaps most importantly, how they will deal with the financial cuts. [Read more...]

Health authority regrets ‘tragic’ nut allergy death

by Ray Philp

A health authority has expressed their “deepest sympathies” for the family of a 9 year old daughter who died of anaphylactic shock shortly after a GP had failed to prescribe a device that could have saved her life.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde were implicated in a report published by the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman that criticised the lack of clear guidance regarding the prescription of adrenaline auto injector pens, or EpiPens.

An EpiPen might have saved Miss C. Photo: D Walsh

[Read more...]

International news headlines

by Tina Charon and Patrick McPartlin

Middle East

Libya

For the moment the US, UK and France are continuing air strikes against the country. A second raid was lead early this morning and destroyed a building in Libya’s capital Tripoli. The building was one of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s command centres. US officials have said that Colonel Gaddafi himself was not a target of the air strikes.

The Arab League, Russia and China have condemned the attacks. Arab League General Secretary Amr Mussa said, “What has happened in Libya differs from the goal of imposing a no-fly zone. What we want is the protection of civilians.” He has also announced that an emergency meeting of the 22-member Arab league is about to be set up.

[Read more...]

‘Old Firm need to forget the past for the sake of the future’

by Ryan C. Gavan

Being an impartial observer, spending time covering the Old Firm clash at Hampden Park yesterday was an experience in the very least. It was the first time the teams have met since the much publicised game two weeks ago, all eyes were watching. I went wondering whether the fans had taken any notice of the warnings or the Summit on the Old Firm.

Union Jacks and Tricolors are abundant at Old Firm matches. Photo: R Gavan

I was greeted by a very heavy police presence. It looked to me like a the preparation for a riot. Mixing with fans on both sides, I noticed that the sectarian attitude is engrained to Old Firm meetings. Tri-colours on one side, Union Jacks on the other, it goes beyond religion to politics, using that term very loosely. One Rangers fan had a scarf with the words “William of Orange” while a Celtic fan wore a top with “Bobby Sands MP” embroidered in orange and green. Speaking to both sets of fans, they blame the other for the trouble. The real issue here is the culture, the so-called “90-minute bigot.” They go to the game, sing their sectarian songs and go home, not thinking about it until the next meeting. The issue for politicians, police and the Old Firm itself, is how to change years of hatred. Many wonder whether this is even possible.

[Read more...]

Iron Age gold hoard to finally be on display at The National Museum of Scotland

by Emily Glass

National Museums Scotland have finally secured a set of four Iron Age gold neck ornaments after raising funds for two years.

The treasure was found by David Booth  in 2009 in his first outing with his metal detector whilst at work. Chief Game Warden at Blair Drummond Safari Park, near Stirling, Booth unearthed the trove which was lying a mere six inches below the surface of a field.

The neck ornaments, or torcs, date between the 1st and 3rd Century BC and will be on display in the National Collections at The National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street.

Mr Booth will receive a reward payment of £462,000 which was set-up by the Queen’s and Lord Treasure’s Remembrancer after he reported his remarkable find to the Treasure Trove Unit.

The treasure has been cited by Culture Minister Fiona Hyslop as being the most important Iron Age find in Scotland’s history. She described the importance of the hoard’s display in The National Museum of Scotland: “I congratulate the National Museum of Scotland on its successful fundraising campaign to ensure that it remains here and will be on free display for the general public.”

Flying visit to London as Leuchars petition is delivered to government

by Patrick McPartlin and Tom Barry

With the closure of RAF Kinloss in Moray already confirmed, fears are mounting over the future of Scotland’s other airbases in Lossiemouth and Leuchars following orders by the Westminster government to cut RAF spending as part of the strategic defence review.

Campaigners are set to hand in a petition with 7000 signatures to Downing Street, protesting the closure of the RAF Leuchars airbase. There are more than 21,000 members of the Save RAF Leuchars group on Facebook, which has been set up by Residents Action Force Leuchars.

One of the Tornado jets based at RAF Leuchars.

[Read more...]

Who wants to be a MacMillionaire?

Henderland Road. One of the city's most affulent areas. Photo by Emily Glass.

by Anne Mackie and Emily Glass

A recent report by Barclays Banking suggests the number of millionaires in Scotland has increased by almost 20 per cent in the past two years.

Around 40,000 individuals now boast net wealth exceeding £1 million – a definite increase from the 34,000 at the end of 2008, and it’s set to rocket by 2020. New evidence indicates Scotland will see a 38% jump in millionaires by the end of 2020, higher than any area other than the north-east of England. That will mean 56,000 Scots millionaires by 2020, leading the country to outstrip the rest of the UK.

[Read more...]

Finally filming the hobbits

by Anne Mackie

After months of delays, filming on the two ‘Hobbit’ movies is now underway in New Zealand. The wheels of ‘the Lord of the Rings’ prequels are finally in motion after plans were delayed due to funding problems, rows over actors’ wages, and director Peter Jackson’s surgery.

New Zealand: Hobbit hotspot

[Read more...]

Do Libyans really support the revolution?

As the standoff with Colonel Gadaffi continues to escalate, Napier News has heard how Libyan students at an English school in Edinburgh have reacted to the rebellion.

Eileen Macintyre said one of her students was determined to go to fight against Gadaffi’s forces.
Finally she and her husband managed to persuade him to stay.

Macintyre, who has extensive connections to Libya, went on to cast doubt over the level of popular support for the rebels.

Listen here to an extended clip of the interview.


Putin offers a more in-depth quote on UN Resolution

by Kirsty Tobin

14.43 Vladimir Putin has gone into more depth on his earlier comment, in which he likened the resolution to “medieval calls for crusades.” He has since gone on to elaborate, saying that: “The resolution is defective and flawed. It allows everything. It resembles mediaeval calls for crusades.”

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded, [Read more...]

2.30p.m. Bulletin

by Katy Docherty, Jen McClure and Tony Garner

Tony Garner in the radio studio

read by Jen McClure and Tony Garner

Listen Here:


Online game relaunch creates new jobs in Edinburgh

By Emily Glass

Internet gaming remains popular

A US Gaming company have revived Dundee-based developer Real Time World (RTW) by buying shares in the business and plans to open a new studio in Edinburgh.

Set up in 2002 by Dave Jones, who was part of the firm responsible for creating Grand Theft Auto,  RTW went into administration last August with around 250 jobs being lost.

[Read more...]

Libya Bulletin

words by Ryan C. Gavan

Fresh attacks on military sites in Libya occurred last night to help protect the civilian population. Edinburgh Napier News gives this special report on the situation.

David Cameron addresses House on Libya situation

by Kirsty Tobin

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded, [Read more...]

Hopes fade for World’s End murder families

by Katy Docherty and David Walsh

Victims Helen Scott and Christine Eadie.

The families of the World’s End murder victims are set to have their hopes dashed when the Double Jeopardy Bill goes before Holyrood. The current law prevents a person from standing trial for the same crime twice but will be scrapped in a session of the Scottish Parliament tomorrow.

The Double Jeopardy Bill will now allow a retrial if evidence arises of the acquitted person admitting guilt or new DNA evidence comes to light to strengthen the case against the accused. The conditions of the Bill have been restricted to murder, rape, culpable homicide and serious sexual offences cases.

Criminal defence lawyer John Scott is skeptical of the plans: ‘There isn’t really any evidence which is absolutely conclusive of guilt. It’s not as if DNA evidence will tell you who did it. DNA evidence is far more likely to tell you who didn’t do it and beyond that, it can tell you who might have done it.

‘But you still need something else beyond DNA evidence in order to be able to convict.’

[Read more...]

Sports round-up: Rangers claim League Cup while Ireland slam grand English dreams

by Tom Barry

A brief round-up of the weekend’s top sports stories.

[Read more...]

12.30p.m. Bulletin

by Katy Docherty, Jen McClure and Tony Garner

Jen McClure and Tony Garner read the 12.30 news bulletin

read by Jen McClure and Tony Garner

Listen Here:


The Libya crisis: a fresh perspective

by Tony Garner

I have never been to Libya but, as an English teacher in Edinburgh, I have met and gotten to know quite a few Libyans in the past couple of years. Many of them were encouraged to come and study in the UK with promises of funding from the Gaddafi government. Typically, they would first strive to improve their English before going on to study at a British university.

Most have been male and, in many cases, their English was almost non-existent when they arrived. Only teaching the verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, there was a limit to how well I could come to understand how they felt about their country’s recent history and politics. One I remember: a beginner student, an affable chef in his early thirties, said to me out of the blue once the simple word, “Lockerbie”. I had been trying to find out what Scottish places he knew, and getting him to pronounce them. I was taken aback, but the almost-total language barrier prevented any dialogue about that most emotive of towns. Shortly afterwards, the student left the school.

I got to know much better a bright woman from near Tripoli who was in her mid-twenties and, compared to the chef, absorbed English like a sponge. In the UK with her husband and expecting a baby, she was alert to humour and mixed well with the other (mostly European students in the class. She had studied dentistry in Libya and wanted to do further study before going back home to practice. One day in class another student, a Spanish woman, asked her apropos of almost nothing what she thought of Gaddafi. Her reply was swift and unhesitating: “I love him.” I wondered at the time whether that was a response learnt by rote, but a presentation she later did on Libya made me doubt it. Gaddafi was the hero of the people. He had stood up to the Americans since they bombed Tripoli in 1986. Every good thing in modern Libya was down to him, including the fact that she could dream of running a well-equipped dental surgery. She finished by inviting us all to visit her country to see how well it worked, its natural beauties and ancient historical sites. [Read more...]

UK backtrack on comments made by defence secretary

by Kirsty Tobin

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

11.20 According to reports, the building has been destroyed. Coalition forces say this building was a command centre.

11.13 Building in Colonel Gaddafi’s compound damaged in Tripoli airstrike.

10.51 Airstrikes by RAF Tornado jets aborted at risk of civilian casualties at target site.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded, [Read more...]

That’s tweeting brilliant! Twitter is five years old

by Tom Barry

Twitter is 5 years old today. Picture: P McPartlin

 

Social networking website Twitter celebrates its fifth birthday today.

The micro-blogging site, which enables users to follow the antics of friends and celebrities via posted updates known as tweets,  was founded in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, and has since grown from the simple idea of an individual using an SMS service to communicate with a small group to being one of the most popular forms of communication in the world and is today estimated to have over 200 million users, generating 65 million tweets a day.

[Read more...]

Let it snow: ski resorts enjoy best weekend of the season

by Gráinne Byrne

A snowboarder enjoys the slopes at Nevis Range. Image from Craig Cameron

Record numbers of Scottish snow-sports fans were treated to access-all-areas passes when almost every run in the country’s ski centres opened up for the best weekend of the season.

Despite other key sporting events taking place, Scotland’s five resorts enjoyed fantastic conditions and huge visitor numbers on Saturday and Sunday. Over 13,000 sports enthusiasts, including skiers, snowboarders, hill-walkers and climbers took to the hills. [Read more...]

Blood Shortages due to lack of Awareness

by Orla O Muiri

Both Ireland and the UK suffer from low blood supplies because of a lack of awareness. The population of Ireland is over four million. Yet, only 3% of the population give blood. In the UK, the situation is worse with 4% of adults actively donating, providing blood for a population of 61 million.

John Kelly, Clerical Officer of Ireland’s givebood.ie said; “Despite the fact that we appear to have a high amount of donors compared to the UK figures. We still run short on supplies as over 3,000 blood donations are needed in Ireland every week.”

The world is seemingly oblivious to the posters, the tv adverts, the leaflets, and the free merchandise used by Ireland’s blood organization ‘giveblood.ie’ and the UK’s ‘National Blood Service’ to encourage citizens to donate. Otherwise they are choosing to ignore them because of their pre conceived notions of what is involved in giving blood.

Andrew Pearce, Head of Donor Advocacy at the National Blood Service said; “Although we do tailor the way in which we advertise our sessions and appeal for blood to encourage certain people to donate, we can not always identify why people do not wish to give blood, as this could be for many reasons. We supply approximately 37,000 units of blood (red cells) each week to the hospitals.”

There are two systems of blood classification; the ABO system and the Rhesus system. Within this, there are eight sub categories of O-, O+, A-, A+, B-, B+, AB- and AB+.

One in four people will need a blood transfusion at some point in their lives.

Kathleen Furlong (60) retired nurse and blood donor said; “I like the idea that my blood has saved a life, it makes me feel good. I don’t understand people who don’t donate but expect to receive if it was them in an accident, there is a lack of awareness there.”

David Daly (34) accountant and non donor said; “It never occurred it to me to give blood and when it did it did not seem like much fun, time off work, needles, hospitals full of bugs. It’s just not for me.”

A unit of Blood lasts for just 36 days and the stock levels are falling. Stock Level’s in England taken on 06 Mar 2011 reveal a low supply in both AB negative (447) and B negative (866) blood. The total count of blood in England at the moment is 52,191 units  to serve a population of  61 million. Platelets have a shorter shelf life of five days. Around 22,000 doses are used in Irish hospitals per week.

The system of blood donation clinics in Ireland and the UK differ due to population dispersal. The UK has permanent blood bank establishments whereas Ireland has mobile clinics which travel around the country.

Kelly said; “What must be taken into consideration is the distribution of population in the rural setting. To have permanent clinics located in the two major cities in the country, and some of the smaller cities for example Limerick, Waterford, Kilkenny and Galway would require increased staff, equipment and fixed venues. These clinics would not serve the surrounding towns very well.”

Pearce said, “There are operational benefits in terms of having a purpose-built building and facilities at a permanent blood clinic, and this arrangement offers more flexibility for donors in the area who know they can attend on any day rather than perhaps 1 day every 4 months.  The disadvantages include the fact that for a clinic to be productive there needs to be enough potential donors in the area to keep the clinic full every day bearing in mind that donors can only give once every 12 weeks.”

The act of giving blood takes approximately 8-15 minutes, the total volume of blood donated is 470ml, which is less than a pint. Human beings contain the equivalent of ten pints. The blood organisations encourage a gap of 90 days between each donation, that is four times a year and four lives saved. World Blood Donor Day (WBDD) takes place on 14 June. The National Blood Service website says; “It is an opportunity to express gratitude to those who donate their blood in order to save lives without expecting anything in return.”

 

Stopping the Traffickers

by Tony Garner

Scotland may be set for its first child trafficking prosecutions after the release of a report claiming the extent of the problem is much worse than previously feared.

Clare Tudor of the Scottish Refugee Council told Napier News that police had taken two individuals into custody.

Tudor told Napier News that children were being trafficked into Scotland for a variety of reasons, including sex trading, benefit fraud and forced labour.

Listen Here as she describes the traumatic effects on the children concerned:


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