Gordon Brown: Scotland should not be given fully devolved tax powers

Gordon Brown today suggested that corporation tax should remain to be set at Westminster and for Scotland to raise 40% of its income as part of his calls for greater devolution of power.

National Insurance would also be best decided at Westminster said Brown, who recommended that only limited powers of taxation be passed on to Holyrood in the event of a No vote.

His proposals have been fiercely criticized by deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who has questioned why the former Prime Minister failed to implement any of these proposals during the his ten year tenure in Westminster.

Brown was speaking in Glasgow today ahead of a tour of Scotland to advocate the union, and suggested six constitutional changes to devolve power, including the permanent status of Scottish parliament as part of the United Kingdom.

His idea to “make for a better relationship between Scotland and the United Kingdom to turn what I could call a centralized system of power to one where there is power sharing” will not appease the nationalists, however, with his plans falling well short of full powers of taxation and welfare.

Instead, he put forward plans for the Scottish parliament to have the power to vary income tax by 15p in the pound as opposed to the current level of 10p set to come into force. The first 5p in the pound of income tax would remain set within the corridors of Westminster, however, with Scotland responsible for raising 40% of its future budget.

“There should be scope for devolved taxation to raise something like 40 per cent of the Scottish Parliament’s expenditure. As we note above, the tax freedom available to the Scottish Parliament is presently very limited – only 12 per cent of its spending – and under the Scotland Act 2012 that figure will rise to around one-third.

“To raise the money that is equivalent to the cost of non-covenanted services – about 40 per cent of its budget – the best way forward is to widen the Scottish Parliament’s power to vary the income tax, which is currently 10 pence, to 15 pence.”

Devolved powers to Scotland would involve pooled resources to strengthen areas of the Scottish economy, including health and education, where Scotland is already in charge of spending:

“Within the social union of the United Kingdom, not only should UK taxes provide directly for redistributive welfare benefits such as the old-age pension, but we should also pool and share sufficient resources across the UK to ensure that the devolved administrations and the UK government can provide, on a common basis, for the key services of the UK welfare state – the right to free health care, and the universal right to education.”

“Whether you are Scots, Welsh, English or Northern Irish you have the right to a pension when elderly, help when unemployed, sick or disabled, universal free health care and basic education.”

Deputy first minister Nicola Sturgeon was quick to attack Brown’s proposals, questioning the authenticity of his desire for devolution, given his inaction during his time as Prime Minister:

“[Gordon Brown] was prime minister for a number of years, he was in government for more than 10 years, and didn’t deliver the powers that he is now saying he thinks Scotland needs. That underlines the point that the only way that we can secure new powers, and the new powers that Scotland needs to meet the challenges we face, is to vote Yes in referendum and support independence.”

SNP’s media spin doctor Kevin Pringle was equally dismissive of Brown’s speech:

Brown’s speech today comes as one part of a wider, concerted cross-party effort from Westminster to put on a united front about devolving powers in the event of a No vote come September.

However, with the parties unable to agree on just what powers, and to what extent, they are willing to devolve to the Scottish parliament, voters are being left with yet more uncertainty as to what the future would hold for a Scotland that rejected independence.

Better Together spokesperson Ross MacRae on cross-party devolution front:


Just this month Scottish Labour announced grandiose plans to back the devolution of key welfare and tax powers to Holyrood in an effort to give undecided Scottish voters more confidence in a No vote.
Despite its unified façade, however, there are deep fault lines within the party regarding the issue, with senior sources admitting that the party are split about the fully devolved powers of income tax.

Any less than full devolution of income tax, as recommended by the party’s Devolution Commission, would be pounced upon by the SNP as a U-turn in Labour policy indicating a lack of commitment to achieving devolved powers.

The Scottish government have previously stated that any measures of devolution that fall short of full powers on taxation and welfare would represent a failure to the people of Scotland in the event of a No vote, and would see a perpetuation of the social inequality handed to Scotland as a result of governments they never voted for.

Eddie Nisbet

Twitter: @eddienisbet

Three Teenagers Killed In East Lothian Car Crash

The three victims credit; Facebook

The three teenagers who were killed in the crash
Credit: Facebook

By Hamza Jabir

Dunbar school in mourning after fatal collision.

Three teenagers have been killed and another seriously injured after a vehicle crashed into a brick buttress in Tyninghame near Dunbar, East Lothian.

David Armstrong, 16, Josh James-Stewart, 15, and Jenna Barbour, 18, have been named as the three fatalities, with survivor Robbie Gemmell, 16, taken to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary where he was receiving treatment yesterday.

They had been travelling along a stretch of road on the outskirts of Dunbar leading to the beach, with the collision happening at approximately 8:25 pm. Yesterday, small pieces of wreckage were visible at the scene and for 20 yards along the road. All four passengers had attended Dunbar Grammar School, with Jenna Barbour having just completed her sixth year and the other three in their fifth year.

Education spokesman for East Lothian Council, Shamin Akhtar, said: “Dunbar is a very close and strong community and very few young people at school will not have known at least one of the young people involved. A special assembly was held this morning with S5 and S6 to reflect on what had happened and to offer comfort and support. Teachers across the school are supporting young people and counselling services are also on hand. Students have been offered the opportunity to go home as long as there’s someone there to support them. However, many have opted to stay to seek support from their friends and staff.”

Akhtar said: “The grief will be felt for a long time and at the moment the school is focusing on supporting its young people and the families of those who died, and on sending our best wishes and thoughts for the recovery of the young person who survived this accident.”

Inspector Richard Latto of Police Scotland has appealed for any witness with information to come forward.

Inspector Latto said: “Our inquiries are ongoing as we try to piece together the circumstances which led to this tragedy. We are also focusing on working closely, supporting the families involved. A full collision investigation will be carried out looking at all factors such as looking for witnesses and the condition of the road and the vehicle. We are looking for any witnesses who saw the vehicle prior to the collision.”

 

Scottish Campaign on Welfare Reform Launch Manifesto

Image Source: Bonnet

Lord Kirkwood. Credit: Bonnet

 

By Andy Little.

Politicians from all sides of the political spectrum came together in Edinburgh on Thursday  13th November to support the launch of the Scottish Campaign on Welfare Reform. The group is a coalition of key third sector organisations from across Scotland.

The Campaign put forward five key reforms which amounts to a new approach to social security.they seek to increase benefit levels to ensure that no one is left in poverty. Make respect for human rights and dignity a cornerstone for a new approach to welfare. Radically simplify the welfare system. Invest in the support needed to ensure that everyone is able to participate fully in society and make welfare benefits work for Scotland.

Chairman, John Dickie said:

“The current approach to social security is not working. We have seen the rise of foodbanks, rising rent arrears and we need to rethink the overall approach to social security.”

Maggie Kelly the co-author of the manifesto said:

“Simple things can reduce poverty such as paying people benefit that raises them out of poverty”

Keynote speaker Lord Archie Kirkwood (Liberal Democrat) praised the role of the  third sector as an important pressure group for change. Lord Kirkwood said:

“There is massive value in working together, policy makers need to hear from the voluntary sector”

He was also critical of the Department of Work and Pensions. Kirkwood said:

“The Department of Work and Pensions is in a state of turmoil, the information technology for universal credit will never work for low income families and the sanctions regime potentially labels everyone a scrounger. That cannot be allowed to continue”

Shiela Gilmour, Labour MP and member of the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee sounded a note of caution when she referred to the cost of reform. Gilmour said:

“The cost has to be discussed it’s not just a  safety net but we must have that debate not just a wish list.”

Jamie Hepburn the SNP MSP and deputy convener of the Scottish Parliament Welfare Reform Committee said:

“I welcome this manifesto for an important contribution to the debate and an important opportunity to imagine a different type of Scotland”

Nobody from the Conservative Party attended the event.

The Department of Work and Pensions was not able to respond to a request to comment.

NHS urges famillies to get MMR vaccinations

NHS Lothian

Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh (Photo: Tom Freeman)

In light of the measles epidemic in Wales and the threat of imminent spread to the rest of Britain, NHS Lothian has highlighted the importance of MMR vaccinations. In a press release from the NHS, families are urged to ensure that they are protected from measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).

Gareth Colfer-Williams, 25, died on Thursday at his home in Swansea, the city at the centre of an epidemic of the disease. Further investigations are being undertaken by the Swansea coroner to establish the cause of death. However, the risk is still high for those who have not had the two MMR vaccinations.

NHS Lothian has admitted that a significant number of Lothian’s teenagers and young adults are considered at risk from measles, mumps and rubella, as they may not have completed or started the course of the vaccine as a child. NHS Lothian is now offering the MMR vaccine to teenagers in schools and through their GPs.

Professor Alison McCallum, the Director of Public Health and Health Policy at NHS Lothian, said:

“Measles, Mumps, and Rubella are preventable by two doses of the MMR vaccine and I would urge all parents to ensure that their children are fully protected from these three diseases. We are now offering the MMR vaccination as part of the school immunisation programme and hope more of our young people will take up the opportunity to protect themselves.”

She said it is now crucial that the course of the vaccine was finished, or in some cases, that young people began the course. Professor McCallum added: “We hope that parents and young people realise that it is never too late to be protected against these diseases.”

Measles is a very infectious virus that causes a fever, cough and rash but can also cause serious problems including blindness and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Mumps can also cause fever along with painful swollen glands in the face and neck and can result in permanent deafness. Rubella is a milder infection but if caught during pregnancy it can cause serious damage to the unborn child.

For an updated timeline on the MMR autism fraud story from journalist Brian Deer, go to: http://briandeer.com/solved/bmj-wakefield-timeline.htm

Chris Hoy Retires From International Cycling

By Steven Robson

Chris Hoy announces retirement in Edinburgh.

Chris Hoy announces retirement in Edinburgh.

Britain’s most decorated Olympian has today announced his decision to retire from international cycling.

Sir Chris Hoy, 37, had a very successful 2012, after winning his fifth and sixth Olympic gold medals in the team sprint and keirin events. He also set the Olympic record in London for the 750 metres team sprint by managing a time of 42.600 seconds.

The Edinburgh-born athlete had hoped to compete for Scotland in the Glasgow Commonwealth Games in 2014, but said his fitness would not allow it.

Speaking to the country’s media at Murrayfield stadium, Hoy said: “Nothing would have given me more pleasure than to have been at Glasgow 2014, but I don’t want to make up the numbers.

“It’s a hard time – one moment at the end of your career when you have to say enough is enough.”

Hoy does not believe, however, that his decision will hinder Scotland’s medal chances in Glasgow: “It’s not as if it’s a one man band. I’ve had my time in the sun, it’s time to let other athletes have their share. It will be a successful Commonwealth Games.”

Speaking of what the future might hold, the six-time Olympic Champion said that he would become an advisor to both the Scottish cycling team and the Scottish Rugby Union, as well as charity work, but quashed speculation that he may take on a great outdoor cycle route: “I’m not going to be cycling around the world.”

Asked what he thought his greatest career moment had been, he said: “To stand on the podium in Athens and to hear your name followed by Olympic Champion – that is what it is all about. But to cap it all off with my sixth gold medal – that was a special day too.”

Hoy said he would still be based in Manchester but would not rule out moving back to Edinburgh at some stage; he added: “I am going to cycle for the rest of my life, and I look forward to getting others to do that too.”

Hoy’s wife Sarra summed up the mood: “It is very emotional, but it is good to come out in the open and announce it.”

Edinburgh Marathon goes ahead

In the wake of the bombing of the Boston marathon last night, the implications for marathon events in the UK are under scrutiny.

edinburgh marathon

Neil Kilgour, director of the Edinburgh Marathon Festival, released a statement this morning: “We are shocked by the events we’ve seen unfold in Boston and our thoughts are with the injured and their families.

“It is a sad day for the running community. Runners’ safety is our primary concern. We work very closely with the police and emergency services when organising all the events over the Edinburgh Marathon Festival weekend and follow their advice.”

The FBI have today opened a ‘potential terrorist inquiry’ into the attack, after the explosions left three dead and at least 170 injured, several critically.

UK police have reassured spectators and runners that the London Marathon will go ahead as planned this Sunday, but it is understood that security will be stepped up considerably.

Around 27,000 have registered to take part in the 2013 Edinburgh Marathon, which takes place on the 25th/26th of May.

image by Lesley Martin for Edinburgh Festival Marathon

Media Mondays – Dame Joan Stringer – 25.03.2013

By Lauren Elliott:
Our very own principal gives a speech on her life, her university and her favourite things.
She was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2001, and elevated to  Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in the 2009 Birthday Honours.
In 2003 she was appointed Principal/Vice-Chancellor of Edinburgh Napier University, the first woman to be leader of a Scottish university.

Listen Here:


Media Mondays – Stewart Kirkpatrick – 18.03.2013

Stewart Kirkpatrick is one of the UK’s leading digital content experts.
He spoke at our Media Mondays lecture about the digital and social media aspects of Yes Scotland.
You can find the campaign website here: www.yesscotland.net

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Media Mondays – Iain MacWhirter – 04.03.2013

Iain MacWhirter joined the BBC’s devolution unit in 1979 from Edinburgh University, becoming Scottish political correspondent in 1987.
He has worked at both the UK Parliament and Scottish Parliament, presenting the BBC2 programmes “Westminster Live” and “Scrutiny”.
He writes weekly columns for The Herald and Sunday Herald and has presented the Scottish Parliament magazine programme “Holyrood Live.”

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Media Mondays – Chris McLaughlin – 25.02.2013

BBC Scotland’s senior football reporter, Chris McLaughlin, talked today about a life behind sports journalism, drawing from his own experiences.
Chris is also a former student of Napier who graduated in 1999 with a journalism degree.
Speaking on how he is a one man band when it comes to his work, he offers advice on how to get ahead of the game whether you’re interested in broadcast or print.

Listen in Here:


Bobby Hain – Media Mondays – 18.02.2013

Bobby Hain, Director of Channels-STV, paid a visit to Napier today. His hour long talk consisted of information on the success of STV since it started along with an overview of the online features STV now offers its audience.

However, what all Napier students wanted to hear about was the much anticipated ETV. STV and Napier University have teamed up together to launch ETV in early 2014. Bobby gave a very clear and concise outline of what ETV is to be about and let students know how they can get involved.

Overall, a very informative and clear speech. Definitely worth a listen.

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Media Mondays – Catriona Shearer – 04.02.2013

By: Lauren Elliott

NapiersCatShearerCatriona Shearer, who studied at Napier 10 years ago, came back again to tell her life story and revisit tales of her experiences here.
She tells of how she climbed the ladder from being a student at Napier to working as a presenter for the BBC. We find out how she managed to get her work experience at BBC Radio5 Live and what work she does on a daily basis.
Catriona gives a very warm speech and provides plenty of inspiration and advice for student journalists who are just starting out. This talk is well worth a listen.

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Media Monday- Richard Walker – 28/01/2013

By Lauren Elliott, Lisa Mitchell and Alex Neal

Editor of the Sunday Herald, Richard Walker, visited Napier University today to talk about the trials and tribulations of a Sunday paper in Scotland.  This engaging and innovative talk delves into topics such as the arduousness of transforming your reputable print newspaper into an online equivalent and that controversial super injunction story.

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Media Mondays – The Rangers Story

By Alexander Neal, Lauren Elliott  and Lisa Mitchell.

BBJbqtzCcAEOLdpListen to Alex Thomson (Channel 4 News) and Mark Daly (BBC Scotland) discuss the origins of the problems Rangers faced and how the situation at present with regard to the saga. A detailed and extended talk from the pair, who provided witty insight and analysis of the events that led to the current scenario, as well as answering questions pitched by audience members.

This chronological account provides a good reference point for anyone interested in the story, and how it was covered in various forms of media. The pair discuss how they covered the story, on top of talking about how other agencies covered it and why.

This was a popular talk, with both men exploring in depth the issues surrounding possibly the biggest sports story to come from Scotland.

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New Poll Claims Dangers in Current Drug Legislation

Legal Highs

Legal Highs

According to a new poll the majority of people think that legalising drugs would make them safer.

This goes against David Cameron’s refusal to set up a Royal Commission to review current drug laws earlier this week.

The poll by Edinburgh drugs advisory service Crew2000 shows over 75% of people think that the illegality of drugs makes them more dangerous.

Commenting on the findings, Dr Winstock, founder and director of Global Drug Survey, said that the main dangers are caused by current legislation preventing the government from providing truthful information:

“Because drugs are illegal people are forced to engage with a criminal underworld which in itself can be a bit dangerous.

“The biggest issue about drugs being illegal is it can be difficult for people to know exactly what they’re taking.  If people knew this, in terms of substance, purity and dose, some people would choose to use that drug more carefully.”

Emma Crawshaw, from Crew2000, said that although there has been a decline in the numbers of those using drugs in Edinburgh, “people who do use are doing so in a more problematic way.”   She said that cannabis and alcohol remained the biggest problem but also pointed to the fact that the rise in availability of ‘legal highs’ was creating a further problem for controlling drugs:

“The biggest risk is that as supply and production is unregulated, and as packaging may well state ‘not for human consumption’ people cannot be sure of what they are actually purchasing.  As so many substances are new, it is very difficult to assess what the long term health effects may be.”

Over 40 new psychoactive substances were identified on the market last year and experts predict that a further 60 new substances will be identified by the end of the year.  Ms Crawshaw said the problem with new substances is people don’t know what they’re buying:

“Many people now purchase these substances over the internet or ‘head shops’, thinking that they are indeed ‘legal highs’ however, they may well contain banned substances i.e controlled drugs or substances that are under the new temporary class banning orders brought in to ban/control new substances while tests are conducted on them to investigate health risks.  Potency may be very variable and quality may well be poor.”

A spokesperson for Apothecary, a local business that sells psychoactive substances and drug paraphernalia, said that the government’s recent decision to keep current drug legislation was a mistake:

“I think that the law should be changed. I think that the government should spend some money on developing safer, less neurotoxic versions of drugs such as MDMA and sell them in a controlled way so that people know what they are getting. It shouldn’t really be up to the government what people can take.”

However, Dr Winstock claims that the term ‘legal high’ is meaningless, giving the example of mephedrone, or ‘meaow-meaow’, which started life as a ‘legal high’ but quickly became illegal.  He also said:

“There’s lots of things that are classed as ‘legal highs’ which don’t get you high.”

“I think there is a legal high market for two reasons:  one is the declining purity of traditionally available drugs, predominantly cocaine and MDMA; and the second is globalisation of media and markets.”

He also says that ‘legal highs’ are attractive because they can be delivered in the post.

“Instead of using dealers, you can get drugs delivered by mail and if you’re a drug manufacturer and distributer, that makes life much easier.”

Media Mondays-Kirsty Wark-03.12.2012

The final talk in our Media Monday sessions of 2012. Newsnight presenter, Kirsty Wark, shares her invaluable experiences and gives crucial advice on broadcasting. From how to get the most out of an interviewee to her encounter with Margaret Thatcher, Kirsty makes not only a useful speech but an enjoyable one too.

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Media Mondays-Val Atkinson and Raymond Snoddy-29.10.2012

By: Alex Neal, Lisa Mitchell and Lauren Elliott

Another talk in the Media Mondays series, which saw Val Atkinson, BBC Scotland’s Head of News and Current Affairs, discuss the reaction of the Jimmy Saville scandal. Her input was combined with the views of Raymond Snoddy, a Journalist and media commentator, who spoke via Skype. Discussion topics included not just the way the BBC handled the news of Jimmy Saville’s death, but also where the future lies, both with regards to the specific case, and to the BBC itself.

Media Mondays 29.10.2012

Simon Pia Lecture-Media Mondays-12.11.2012

By: Lisa Mitchell and Lauren Elliott
Some journalists can change the world by a flick of their pen or by a probing question at the end of their package.  They are able to do this because they aren’t afraid of “the powers that be” and their reaction.  You can’t be frightened to challenge authority.  How else would you get things done? How else could you stand up for what you believe in?

This is what today’s Media Monday session was all about.  Simon Pia, a known anarchist of the news industry, provides hints and tips of how to ruffle a few feathers.

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Alan Clements Lecture 05/10/2012

By Lauren Elliott and Lisa Mitchell

Media Mondays

The next installment of the Media Monday lectures has arrived.  The Director of Content at STV, Alan Clements, one of the most influential men in broadcasting has come to Napier to talk about his career and his experiences in the world of media.

Listen here:


Allan Little Lecture 08/10/2012

By: Lauren Elliott and Lisa Mitchell
Media Mondays

The first of a series of powerhouse lectures by the biggest and best in British Journalism has finally been introduced to Edinburgh Napier News.  The listings of popular and influential journalistic minds will be tagged on Twitter under the name Media Mondays.  This week we had the privilege to host a masterclass starring BBC special correspondent and legend, Allan Little. In his lecture he talks about ‘good writing’ and his experiences in the field.
Listen here:


4pm TV Bulletin

All the latest headlines at 4pm from Edinburgh Napier News.

Update: Man killed in motorway crash

Extended delays occurred on the M8 this morning

Police have identified the person killed in an M8 collision as a 19-year-old man from Bathgate. The teenager was driving a Fiat Stilo, which collided with a MAN HGV at around 1 o’clock this morning. He died at the scene of the accident. The 39-year-old driver was not injured.

The collision happened on the eastbound carriageway of the M8, around one mile east of Harthill.

It is believed that the teenager was driving west on the eastbound carriageway before colliding with the HGV, which was heading east.

Inspector Richard Latto said: “At the moment we are working to establish the circumstances leading up to this collision, and would appeal for anyone who may have been in the area at the time, and who may have seen what happened, to contact police.

Police, Ambulance and Fire Service attended the crash.

A police spokesman said: “We are investigating the circumstances that resulted in this collision and would encourage any motorists who were on the road at the time to contact police immediately.”

“Similarly, anyone with any other information that can assist police with their enquiries ares also asked to come forward.”

Scotland’s busiest motorway experienced tailbacks this morning. Commuters were unaware of the crash which caused the delays.

Bus driver Jim Anderson, who was driving the route this morning, said “this has taken two and a half hours when normally it would take one. Accidents happen that often on this road, you’d think people would be more careful. But it just keeps happening.”

The M8 has now been cleared and commuters should no longer expect delays.

Video: Scotland’s health improves due to smoking ban

Six years have passed since the implementation of the Scottish smoking ban and new evidence suggests the nation is healthier as a result of the change in legislation.

The ban was introduced to protect people from the dangers of passive smoking in public areas. Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) has revealed that it has proved a success among both smokers and non-smokers with 83 per cent of adults supporting the ban and an 86 per cent reduction in second hand smoke in bars.

Speaking about the ban, Sheila Duffy Chief Executive of ASH Scotland outlined the benefits of the ban.

“Six years on we can clearly see how Scotland’s smoke-free law is benefiting people. The law was opposed by the tobacco industry who sought to delay and derail it, much as they are doing with the current legislation. Tobacco smoke is a toxic substance and poses a threat to health, particularly to children’s health. We need to continue to strive for people’s right to breathe clean air.”

A study carried out earlier this month by the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Health and Wellbeing, showed that complications in pregnancy have fallen as a result of the ban. It was found that there had been a decrease in the number of babies being born prematurely and a reduction of infants being born underweight.

Dr Jill Pell who led the research team said:

“These reductions occurred both in mothers who smoked and those who had never smoked. While survival rates for pre-term deliveries have improved over the years, infants are still at risk of developing long-term health problems so any intervention that can reduce the risk of pre-term delivery has the potential to produce important public health benefits.”

Nurse suspended over child abuse claims

An experienced nurse has been suspended from her post after being charged with committing sexual offences against a minor.

Rhona Sharman, 50, has been suspended from her position as a staff nurse in West Lothian by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). The ban is expected to last 18 months while the accused faces the criminal charges.

The nurse has been charged with taking indecent photographs of a child, causing an older child to be present while engaging in sexual activity, communicating indecently with an older child and causing an older child to participate in sexual activity.

According to the NMC the offences are alleged to have taken place between August and October last year and involve a child aged between 13 and 16.

Douglas Sharman, 46, is also facing two charges of intercourse with an older child, causing an older child to participate in sexual activity, causing an older child to be present while engaging in sexual activity, communicating indecently with an older child and taking indecent photographs of a child.

Since being charged by Strathclyde Police on October 28, Ms Sharman has not carried out any clinical duties.

Internal investigation

The NMC investigating committee ruled that it was in the public interest to suspend the nurse until the council had completed its investigation into the allegations.

A statement from the panel said: “This is one of those rare cases where public interest alone necessitates an interim suspension order as an appropriate response. The panel is of the view that the allegations, if proven, suggest that you demonstrated poor judgement.

Your position as a registered nurse requires you to maintain certain standards including that you must always act lawfully, whether those laws relate to your professional practice or personal life, and that you must uphold the reputation of your profession.

“The panel considered that the reputation of the profession would be damaged if an order were not in place… the alleged behaviour would fall well below the public’s expectation of the behaviour of a registered nurse.”

They noted that the alleged incidents had taken place outside work.

Chris Dickson, Ms Sharman’s lawyer, said the accused denied the allegations made against her.

Energy investment creates 800 jobs in Leith

Renewable Energy creates 800 new jobs in Leith.

By: Anna Redman

Spanish wind turbine manufacturer, Gamesa, has announced their plan to create around 800 jobs at a new Edinburgh plant, which will be located in Leith.

The investment in this project will be about £125m.

[Read more...]

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