Scotland’s first Festival of Erotic Arts smothers the smut

With Edinburgh International Festival’s much-anticipated summer programme being launched on Wednesday and the first Fringe tickets already on sale, March is the time when the buzz of Edinburgh’s summer festivals really kicks off.

But there’s a new festival in town which is getting the tongues of arts enthusiasts wagging: the Festival of Erotic Arts (FEA).

Running for three days in June, FEA is the first of its kind in Scotland and follows a growing number of cities who have begun hosting such festivals in recent years; Seattle’s Festival of Erotic Art is now in its tenth year, and attracts over 10,000 visitors, while similar events take place annually in Paris, Berlin and New York among others.

As with any new and controversial event, FEA’s programme announcement sparked furore over the weekend, with both the city council and the Church of Scotland voicing concerns over the potential risks posed to vulnerable women and the impact advertising could have on children.

But rather than reinforcing and perpetuating clichés, the festival’s organisers, Itsy Live Events, promise to give a platform to erotic art in all its forms, as well as creating a place for art and performances not otherwise seen in mainstream venues.

Events are typical of any other arts festival; exhibitions and talks include Erotic: Surreal and Abstract and A Spoken History of the Erotic Arts. The innocently named Arts & Crafts Fair is being plugged as “a one-of-a-kind sexy fair” with everything from books to accessories to clothes being sold by craftmakers and artists alike.

For those keen to dip their toe into the erotic water, there’s a beginner’s workshop in Japanese style bondage, which involves decorative ties with ropes. Run by a bondage professional, the ticket price includes a goody bag with lesson sheets, 15 metres of rope, and an all-important pair of safety scissors.

Despite being a short, weekend festival, many of the names involved in the FEA are the crème de la crème of the UK’s fetish scene. London-based Torture Garden’s fetish, burlesque and body art club nights for “alternative arty weirdos” are the biggest in the world, with previous visitors including Marilyn Manson, Dita Von Teese and Jean Paul Gaultier. A debate on the nature of human sexuality will be hosted by award nominated cabaret act, ArtWank, while internationally bestselling author and blogger extraordinaire, Zoe Margolis, will be giving a Q&A on the art of sex blogging.

With Margolis a regular contributor to The Guardian and The Observer, the FEA is going out of its way to make sure this festival is taken seriously. Describing it as “a sleaze-free celebration of a thriving art form”, there’s an undeniable absence of smut in the way it’s being marketed – and if nothing else, it’s good advertising for Itsy Live Events’ other specialist service, “reputation management”.

Government propose to change live music law

By Jamie Mann

sparrow-and-the-workshopThe government has expressed their will to improve the UK live music scene after proposing to allow small capacity venues to hold gigs without a licence last Thursday.  Though the proposition is currently undergoing a 12-week consultation, musicians and venue-owners alike have been offered hope for a prominent music scene; the scene has been somewhat restricted since the initiation of the 2003 Licencing Act.  The act currently enforces that venues of any capacity must possess a licence in order to host musical entertainment; obtaining a licence is not a simple task  as many have found to process strenuous and expensive to complete.

Nick Stewart, manager of the popular club Sneaky Pete’s agreed that the government’s proposal would be an asset to Edinburgh’s music scene with numerous clubs and pubs who could grant customers live music.  Stewart did not deem the process of achieving a licence an ordeal mentioning that it was “pretty easy” however, the capacity of his club was reduced from 120 to 84.  Though Stewart highlighted that the 2005 act affects Scotland and differs from the 2003 act, should the government’s proposition be successful , an improvement Edinburgh’s music scene could be imminent.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/oct/21/police-law

http://lesbonner.mycouncillor.org.uk/2009/10/22/government-proposals-for-live-music-are-a-damp-squib/

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