by Kirsty Tobin

15.24 UK officials have reiterated that Gaddafi is under no circumstances a target.

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded,

by Gráinne Byrne

Third session of Holyrood about to go into recess

As we approach the last official day for Holyrood MSPs before Parliamentary recess, opposing parties are marking their line in the sand ahead of tomorrow’s final questions session.  This final session, before dissolution, sets the tone for a battle between the parties leading to the election on 5 May 2011.

In an attempt to engage with the public, First Minister Alex Salmond and his main opponent, Labour leader Iain Gray, will take part in various debates over the next few weeks.  Key issues in the frame include higher education, the economy, the health system and, perhaps most importantly, how they will deal with the financial cuts.

by Kirsty Tobin

14.43 Vladimir Putin has gone into more depth on his earlier comment, in which he likened the resolution to “medieval calls for crusades.” He has since gone on to elaborate, saying that: “The resolution is defective and flawed. It allows everything. It resembles mediaeval calls for crusades.”

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded,

by Kirsty Tobin

14.14 David Cameron has announced that “his government and the attorney general are satisfied that the resolution gives a responsibility to respond to Gaddafi and to use all measures to enforce the no fly zone.” This may lead to a deployment of ground troops. The UN resolution effectively freezes the assets of Gaddafi and his family. Ed Miliband responds by welcoming the action in Libya. He wants reassurance that “the action will happen in a timely fashion” and he also wants to know what the “long-term future” will be in the wake of the Libyan action.

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded,

by Tony Garner

I have never been to Libya but, as an English teacher in Edinburgh, I have met and gotten to know quite a few Libyans in the past couple of years. Many of them were encouraged to come and study in the UK with promises of funding from the Gaddafi government. Typically, they would first strive to improve their English before going on to study at a British university.

Most have been male and, in many cases, their English was almost non-existent when they arrived. Only teaching the verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, there was a limit to how well I could come to understand how they felt about their country’s recent history and politics. One I remember: a beginner student, an affable chef in his early thirties, said to me out of the blue once the simple word, “Lockerbie”. I had been trying to find out what Scottish places he knew, and getting him to pronounce them. I was taken aback, but the almost-total language barrier prevented any dialogue about that most emotive of towns. Shortly afterwards, the student left the school.

I got to know much better a bright woman from near Tripoli who was in her mid-twenties and, compared to the chef, absorbed English like a sponge. In the UK with her husband and expecting a baby, she was alert to humour and mixed well with the other (mostly European students in the class. She had studied dentistry in Libya and wanted to do further study before going back home to practice. One day in class another student, a Spanish woman, asked her apropos of almost nothing what she thought of Gaddafi. Her reply was swift and unhesitating: “I love him.” I wondered at the time whether that was a response learnt by rote, but a presentation she later did on Libya made me doubt it. Gaddafi was the hero of the people. He had stood up to the Americans since they bombed Tripoli in 1986. Every good thing in modern Libya was down to him, including the fact that she could dream of running a well-equipped dental surgery. She finished by inviting us all to visit her country to see how well it worked, its natural beauties and ancient historical sites.

by Kirsty Tobin

14.10 UN officials reiterate the importance of coalition forces being in complete agreement on strategy for dealing with the Libya situation.

13.20 Cuban and Venezuelan officials have come out against the coalition’s strikes on Libya, citing the risk of civilian casualties as the reason for their opposition of the operation.

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

11.20 According to reports, the building has been destroyed. Coalition forces say this building was a command centre.

11.13 Building in Colonel Gaddafi’s compound damaged in Tripoli airstrike.

10.51 Airstrikes by RAF Tornado jets aborted at risk of civilian casualties at target site.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded,

by Gráinne Byrne

A snowboarder enjoys the slopes at Nevis Range. Image from Craig Cameron

Record numbers of Scottish snow-sports fans were treated to access-all-areas passes when almost every run in the country’s ski centres opened up for the best weekend of the season.

Despite other key sporting events taking place, Scotland’s five resorts enjoyed fantastic conditions and huge visitor numbers on Saturday and Sunday. Over 13,000 sports enthusiasts, including skiers, snowboarders, hill-walkers and climbers took to the hills.

by Kirsty Tobin

12.27 UK officials scramble to retract comments made by defence secretary Liam Fox stating that Gaddafi is a legitimate target. Speaking on the BBC, chief of the defence staff, General Sir David Richards, said: “Absolutely not. It is not allowed under the UN resolution and it is not something I want to discuss any further.”

New York Times reports that four of their journalists being held in Libya have been released. One, Stephen Farrell, has dual Irish and British citizenship.

11.20 According to reports, the building has been destroyed. Coalition forces say this building was a command centre.

11.13 Building in Colonel Gaddafi’s compound damaged in Tripoli airstrike.

10.51 Airstrikes aborted at risk of civilian casualties.

For live updates, follow us on twitter: Edinburgh Napier News

To follow our account of today’s events as they unfolded,