Picture credit: IMDb
Picture credit: IMDb

The stars of Allied, Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard, are preposterously beautiful people. It’s not fair, to be honest.

Place these two actors in any scene, and their presence can be somewhat show-stealing.

Not so in director Robert Zemeckis’ Allied, a film that from the start has a decidedly old-fashioned feel – in the best possible way. Both Pitt and Cotillard are classic movie stars, of a kind that is too rare these days. The movie itself has a somewhat timeless aura to it, often feeling as though Allied could have been filmed at any time over the past 60 years, apart from the odd modern flourish that Zemeckis brings to the screen.

The final film in the British fantasy film franchise took the top prize at the Empire Film Awards 2012 in London last night.

Along with Best Film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scooped the award for Best Director, for David Yates. Accepting the award he commented, “It’s a real treat to get this from people who love movies,” referencing the fact that the awards are decided entirely by the public.

Harry Potter was not the only British film to emerge victorious, with Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy winning the awards for Best British Film, Best Thriller, and Best Actor, which went to self-proclaimed ‘veteran’ actor Gary Oldman. Oldman, who received his first Oscar nomination this year after 32 years in the industry, commented that he was delighted to be receiving an award voted for by movie-goers, “This is a very special award, because it isn’t political. There’s no agenda, it’s just movie fans and I will cherish this.”

Best Actress went to Olivia Colman for her harrowing portrayal of a battered house-wife in Paddy Consedine’s Tyrannosaur. “Although it doesn’t seem it, it was the most enjoyable experience I’ve ever had on set,” said Colman on accepting her award.

Another British film, The Inbetweeners, beat out raunchy comedy Bridesmaids to win the Best Comedy prize.

Listen to Katrina Conaglen and Kirsten Waller’s discussion of the awards in an Edinburgh Napier News podcast extra:

Listen here:

by Jane Bretin

Scotland is inaugurating its first silent film festival in Falkirk today. The Hippodrome Festival of Silent Cinema is set to last three days, from Friday to Sunday and will feature a number of all time

Credit miss mass

classics as well as less famous movies.

The festival includes the screening of a dozen films to suit all ages and tastes as well as an ongoing exhibition in the Bo’ness library. The exhibition retraces the evolution of cinema in the Falkirk area and highlights the importance of the 7th art to this day.