Toddlers to be given swine flu jab

There will be a focus on administering the swine flu jab to children under fives and personal careers following advice by the chief medical adviser.

The second phase of the H1N1 vaccination programme will see more than a quarter of a million Scottish children immunised and individuals considered a high risk to their patients.

Earlier this week a child died from the bug and man in the Lothian area died yesterday.

Yesterday health secretary, Nicola Sturgeon, guaranteed that priority persons would be vaccinated before Christmas.

In response to phase two of the programme, Ms Sturgeon said: “We anticipate this will happen during December, although completion of the vaccination of young children is not expected until mid January.”

Since April, 39 people in Scotland have died from the category five virus, 142 in England, 21 in Wales and 13 in Northern Ireland.

Many groups have opposed the anti-virus jab due to side effects it may cause.

Edinburgh Napier News spoke to two mothers in Leith today to find out their views.

US: Who Gets the H1N1 Vaccine First

by Margarita Dimitrova

According to a Harvard School of Public Health survey, two thirds of parents in the United States have failed to find the H1N1 vaccine for their children. From the total of 36 million hard- to – find doses that have been distributed in New York City, Wall Street firms Goldman Sachs and Citigroup received together 14, 000 doses, while priority groups such as children and pregnant women are left empty- handed.

After receiving their share of the state’s shipment from the public -run Centers for Disease Control, the New York City government health authorities are the ones who send the vaccines to the banks whose employers are bound by the CDC to distribute the vaccine only to population deemed to be at high risk. But the truth is that the CDC has no power to enforce how the vaccine is doled out.

Mary Kate Cary a reporter from US News and World Reports one of the leading news magazines in America particularly known for being distinguished from its counterparts for focusing mainly on political, economic, health and education stories, admitted earlier this week while covering the story fr the magazine:  ”Believe me, as a parent of a high risk child who had a heck of a time getting her a shot last week- I think this is outrageous.”

Within the debates some are suggesting that the banks should have donated their allocated vaccines, like Morgan Stanley who received 1,000 doses of the vaccine for its New York and suburban offices, but the company turned over its entire supply to local hospitals when it found out it received shipments before some areas hospitals.

Health professionals say giving the vaccine to these large businesses is a great avenue for vaccinating people.

Carol Lynne a member of the national collaborative grassroots effort called The Tax Day Tea Party who gained vast popularity over the past year organizing protests against the out of control government spending is also torn choosing in between the two sides of the story, asking the questions: ”Are we seeing our first dose of rationing from publicly run health care? Or is this anger being misdirected and just another attempt to create manufactured anger against Wall Street and large employers?”

Most likely the right answers to these could only be released after experiencing the results of whether the H1N1 vaccine has been distributed efficiently. Although one thing is known for sure everyone in New York wants to be a part of this.

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image courtesy of usnews.com

 

Student Nurses to Receive Frontline Vaccines

By Amy Sutherland

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Courtesy of NHS

Nursing and midwifery students at Edinburgh Napier University have been informed by email that they are entitled to receive the vaccination against the H1N1 virus if they wish.

The NHS Board for Lothian and Borders has agreed to allow nursing students to attend one of several sessions arranged in the area to receive their jabs.

The email also confirmed that students who have been allocated a placement outwith the Lothian and Borders area are still eligible to participate in any of the organised sessions.

At present, it is only those currently on placement that are given this opportunity and those beginning their placements in January will be contacted nearer the time.

Given that media coverage over the last few months has questioned the number of healthcare workers choosing to have the vaccine, it is unknown how many students will go ahead and take up this opportunity.

Christine Pollock, Director of Undergraduate Studies at Napier University’s School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Care said it was “hard to estimate” how many would opt to get the vaccine and that their willingness may be “dependent on a number of factors.”  She emphasised the need for students to consider their options and take advice from the Scottish Government about accessing vaccinations for both pandemic flu and also seasonal flu.

One midwifery student admitted she felt wary of the vaccine given the way it has been “fast-tracked” but felt it was best to go ahead and receive the jab.  Another student, not currently on placement, commented that she was glad to have another couple of months to decide.

The union UNISON and Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson have already called for the vaccination of healthcare workers amid fears that patients’ health could be put at risk and the NHS left seriously short-staffed if the vaccine is shunned.


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