University of Edinburgh celebrates Scottish culture on Saint Andrew’s Day

The University of Edinburgh celebrated Saint Andrew’s day by holding their annual traditional music concert at St Cecilia’s Hall on Saturday as a way of celebrating Scottish culture.

The event, organised by the Celtic and Scottish studies department, featured performances by University of Edinburgh staff and students, both past and present, and included a mix of music.

Gary West, a Professor in Celtic and Scottish studies, who curated the event, said:

 

“This day has become a part of tradition as we have been celebrating Saint Andrew day on behalf of the University of Edinburgh for more than 10 years.”

West added: “The idea is that we have a lot of musical talent among the staff and students, we try to bring people together who are associated with the department.

“This is a public event but we tend to welcome staff and students, including overseas students, as it’s a chance for them to get a better understanding of the Scottish culture.”

Katherine Campbell, a former senior lecturer in Celtic and Scottish studies, performed some historical songs. She said: “I’ve been taking part for three years, it is a great event and it worked very well tonight with a mix of performers.”

One of the performers, Sam Sorley, a singer-songwriter from Edinburgh in his final year of Scottish Studies said: “Tonight, I played three songs, including some American tunes and the last song was the Cuckoo bird which is a great song that travelled to America and travelled back again.

“I’m really interested in the immigration songs from Scotland to America to see how they changed in America.”

Attendee Mike Lean, a Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Glasgow, said: “It is a great event to celebrate Scotland on St Andrew’s day. It is not a big event but we do have the evening to relax together.

“It’s a very special event because the University of Edinburgh brings back its most illustrious graduates, who are all very accomplished musicians, and it’s lovely that the public can come too.”

Krystyna Saumelukowa, a member of the general counsel at the university, who arranged to receive a notification from the university’s office to ensure she did not miss the event, said: “It’s a lovely occasion and a privilege to attend.”

St. Andrew’s Day is Scotland’s official national day and is celebrated each year on 30 November.

Celtic and Scottish studies will present another musical and literary celebration, called Voice of the people #Hamish 100, next Friday, 6 December, at the Queen’s hall in Edinburgh.